About your Search

20140226
20140306
STATION
KPIX (CBS) 8
CNNW 7
KGO (ABC) 6
MSNBCW 5
CSPAN 2
CSPAN2 2
CNBC 1
FBC 1
KICU 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LINKTV 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 53
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
environment in place. we had cyber hackers come in now up to two years to stool these coins. not only do they steal customer le 100,000 they sto coins from the owner specifically. >> what do you think is the likelihood that these people will ever get their money back? there is no regulation? there are no laws? why should they? dory.t is the fed assumes there's no consumer protection whatsoever and without the consumer protection, these investors could lose everything. most probably they have lost everything. bitcoin itself is untraceable. once these transactions are done, they are irreversible. it is anonymous. it is hard to track down the criminals. it is hard to get the money back. , i'm noto seems to me a lawyer by any means, establishing standing, the most basic legal principle that any suit has to go through, is virtually impossible because of the way bitcoin is designed it so there is no location and place. that is correct. there's no legal structure over the top of it as well as any sort of regulation over it. the chance of getting money back is quite low. what is very interesting
difficult intelligence environment to operate in after all, the russians have been so sort of nervous about western and in particular american presence in ukraine and other states on their borders. they threw out people from nonprofits and nongovernmental organizations that were providing sort of social support and democratic training and leadership training because they believe that they were age ents of the american government. nothing could be further from the truth. but it tells you something about this being a real tense environment. you go to all your technical means of intelligence. satellite, electronics surveillance. you be sure that all the assets of the u.s. government and our allies around the world are being used to understand military what the order of battle is, exactly what assets they're moving closer and into the crimea. but spider marks is quite right. this is an invasion. it is what it is. and to sort of threaten that in june we won't show up to the g 8 isn't really -- tells you we don't have a lot of leverage over the russian. let's remember the president and the white
of the white house, marking what could be the largest youth sit in on the environment in a generation. >> we are here to march to the white house and form one of the largest accessible disobedience for climate ever. hundreds of young people all came here from all over the country, 42 states, to show president obama the keystone xl is not ok and not in our national interest. than 80nts for more colleges rallied at georgetown university and then marched to the white house were some unfurled a black tarp and laid on the sidewalk to create a human oil spill. hundreds locked themselves to the white house fence before being arrested. president obama is expected to make a decision on whether to approve the keystone xl pipeline in the coming months. more on the protest and the pipeline later in the broadcast. the venezuelan president is facing a new round of protests against his government. despite the carnival holiday, thousands of opposition protesters marched and then clashed with police sunday in the capital caracas. at least 70 people have died in bed as well as worst unrest for a decade. -- at
the government's case is weak because the cops are doing their job in a tough environment. >> part of the job is that you can't sometimes put on a public relations persona when you're dealing with drug dealers and pimps and the scumbags that they have to deal with in this kind of an assignment. so, yes, these guys are -- are real officers dealing in very dangerous and volatile environments and they have to have a tough exterior. >> reporter: a second indictment accuses officer edmond robles, sergeant ian furminger and another officer not in court today of stealing marriage from evidence and telling informants to sell it and split the proceeds with them. the attorney questions the validity of the accusations. >> i know one of those informants attempted to extort one of these officers. i have grave concerns about the reliability and the credibility of the informants in that case. >> reporter: attorneys for a few of the officers insist the government's case is weak. they will not be making any deals. and they say they are confident the juries will find them not guilty. live in san francisco, lin
started in 2008. the poll found people in environment, north dakota had the lowest flu rates. in the bay area new new flu deaths reported this week. santa clara leads bay area with the most death. a 15th victim was reported earlier this week. >>> new troubles for sears, the retailer is investigating a possible security breach. officials with sears say they are actively reviewing their systems, but so far have found no information indicating a breach. it's not clear what prompted the security investigation. according to bloomberg news the security review is still at an early stage and pinpointing a cyber attack can take weeks of the sears is already coping with years' of declining sale and looking to reenergy sales with a focus on echief meteorologist. >>> it appears that a reaction to spike lee harsh word of gentrification came in the form of a spray can and a rock or two. somebody painted "do the right thing on lee'sliehood home in brooklyn. vandals painted the stairs on lee family home as well. incident happened days after the filmmaker spoke out about wealthy new residents moving into
on there. it's a different environment than it was in 2005 or 2006. i would hesitate to say it's over. i think you have to be careful about that. >> whenever i'm in new york, i hear about silicon alley. you hear about, this is the new silicon valley in texas. why is silicon valley continuing to draw the best and brightest? >> is a network effect. if you look at five companies come $5 billion in tech from silicon valley, and you name five in new york, it's hard to find although new york is doing well. it's a network effect. if you're a world-class engineer , where should you go? the overwhelming answer is result,valley, and as a all of the best executives are in silicon valley, or all the ones who know how to scale companies are in silicon valley. there's a predominant amount of money in silicon valley and so forth and the culture itself is very conducive to building companies. all those things combined to make silicon valley a very strong network. it's kind of like hollywood. digital cameras, how hard is it to make a movie? you can make a movie in idaho. but even getting the best key gri
outside of high school. jump-starting their career. >> there is no better environment to do it than on a community college camp news and study epbts under 21 years old say a lower sampling age would allow them to achieve a higher under standing of wine -- students under 21 years old say a lower sampling age would allow them to achieve a higher understanding of the wine. >> reporter: mark kelly, kpix5. >> the bill is nick named sip and spit. they would not be able to swallow the wine. >>> the police are ramping up their police efforts for 93- year-old man who has been missing since wednesday. rob either davis was last seen driving away from marine joe's restaurant. he was heading towards northbound 101. and today, the police and volunteers put up flyers at businesses around downtown san rafael. dave sis 5 '7, 139 pounds with gray hair and gray eyes. the police say he has medical conditions and takes medications but overall in good health. >> there may be concerns about short term memory loss or he could have been confused with the weather. it was raining on wednesday night and raini
environment. that they're working on a report about the cia's detention and interrogation programs. >> the long beach plus telegram says former secretary of state hillary clinton is comparing russia's actions in ukraine to nazi germany. -- places like czechoslovakia and romania and other places. hitler kept saying they're not being treated right. i must go and protect my people, and that's what's gotten everybody so nervous. reporter karen robes meeks at the event, confirmed the quote. says >> the ceo of general motors is launching an internal review ataunching issue how they delayed reporting a defective switch. the cars involved in the recall are from 2007 before. >>> and the candidates facing off to be the next governor of d the "sta texas. h the lone star state held the first statewide primary tuesday. republicans chose greg abbott to succeed rick perry. wendy davis coasted to the democratic nomination. >>> it's 7:19.7:19 ahead, the $100 million bet to legalize gambling and what it hat may mean for the mob. first, time to check your local weather. >> announcer:
environment. that got off the ground. we are seeing wealthy investors turning it into something that can be more useful to invest in, as a way to create faster, more efficient transactions. >> i have to be honest with you. who would invest in bitcoin. why would they invest in bitcoin. i understand that price is low, currently. and the other problem was the price fluk twuted dramatically, right. >> four sure, and i would not recommend anyone invest in boit coin until there are regulations and until those are in place, and even then, there'll be a lot more mainstream more investment to come down the line before i recommend anyone get into this. >> how long do you think it will be before bitcoin gets back on track? >> i think it will be a couple of months. once we see regulations come online, superintendent lowsk. >> led the way, issuing licences. we'll see that, it will be a while before mainstream users will want to take a look. >> rob while, great to have you on the program. thanks for sharing your insight. >> from bitcoin to a different commodity. gold coins. a california couple walkin
of markets with a bad the environment for business? >> he is in answering in mandarin chinese. i could tell you what he is saying but you have to wait. you cannot afford to miss it. [ male announcer ] hands were made for playing. legs, for crossing. feet...splashing. better things than the joint pain and swelling of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. if you're trying to ma, now may be time to ask about xeljanz. xeljz (tofacitinib) is a small pill, not an injection or infusion, for adults with moderate to severe ra for whom methotrexate did not work well. xeljanz can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. seris, sometimes fatal infections and cancers have happened in patients taking xeljanz. don't start xeljanz if you have any infection, unless ok with your doctor. tears in the stomach or intestines, low bod cell counts and higher liver tes and cholesterol levels have happened. your doctor should perform blood tts before you start and while taking xeljanz, and roinely check certain liver tests. tell your doctor if you have been to a region where certain fungal
? >> well, it's a new operational environment for him. where we want him to work is the new york city subway system. we do transit canine. because it's a stressful environment overseas in afghanistan, he -- it's very hard for a dog to work in our subway system. >> tell the people what he's going to be doing. by the way, what experience did he learn over there that he can translate into saving lives here in new york? >> cesar is an explosive detection dog. he's trained on all the odors we train on here in new york. he does have 12 legitimate finds in afghanistan. so he's proven. now what we're going to do is transition him into a police dog. he's going to be patrolling the new york city subway system. >> so you guys are going to go through a 12-week session together? >> yes. >> new training. >> what needs to be done? >> i'm not sure. we haven't started the training yet. we're starting as of this week. i'm new to the transit system. i came from a precinct. >> so you're both starting together. he's going to start with a new name, correct? >> no, we're going to keep the name. >> oh, that's great
in a different world. we wanted to create an environment that the guests don't want to move. it's been a long haul. really, how many awards show, how much rain, how much traffic? i really do want to create meaningful experiences. i really want to create an environment where those can gather to celebrate. >> reporter: there is plenty to see here and eat here thanks to wolfgang puck and his staff. i'm calling this party beauty and the feast.v, >> it's all of wolfgang's favorites and then some. they're sitting down and having like one dinner, eight ounces or 12 ounces of one thing, they'll have 40 different items. >> reporter: i tasted the mac and cheese with black truffle. now i know why truffles are so expensiv expensive. i took my oscar to go and on the subject of oscars -- >> here is the engraving station. this is exactly where the winners will be with one guest with a glass of champagne and having their oscar engraved. >> reporter: this ball takes place in a 28,000 square foot room, surrounded with some remarkable vertical garden. >> it has to be the next. it has to be the new idea, and the
come in here and you're really in a different world. we wanted to create an environment that the guests don't want to move. it's been a long haul. really, how many awards show, how much rain, how much traffic? i really do want to create meaningful experiences. i really want to create an environment where those can gather to celebrate. >> reporter: there is plenty to see here and eat here thanks to wolfgang puck and his staff. i'm calling this party beauty and the feast. >> it's all of wolfgang's favorites and then some. they're sitting down and having like one dinner, eight ounces or 12 ounces of one thing, they'll have 40 different items. >> reporter: i tasted the mac and cheese with black truffle. i took my oscar to go and on the subject of oscars -- >> here is the engraving station. this is exactly where the winners will be with one guest with a glass of champagne and having their oscar engraved. >> reporter: this ball takes place in a 28,000 square foot room, surrounded with some remarkable vertical garden. >> it has to be the next. it has to be the new idea, and the installation lo
of the world sporting equipment does not hold up to the tough environment. one man is trying to eliminate part of the challenge. >> we were watching a news story about the flight of children in war zones and refugee champs. and the simplest most effective story was to play. simply and structured play. that was all the inspiration tim needed. he knew there were programs sending soccer balls to third world communities. he knew they didn't last long in the playing fields found in those communities. that's when he imagined a solution. >> making a ball that would not go flat so they could just play. >> tim janeghan is a lir cyst, working with musicians, including siting, when tim janeghan mentioned the idea to sting, he not only liked the idea but offered to fund the research and design phase of developing the ball. >> pleas let this be so successful that i can do for someone else what he did for me. i still get emotional when i think about it. >> 11 months, two tries later it created nearly an indesproductable ball made from foam that doesn't need to be inflated. >> when did you know you had somet
that are more adaptive to those environments to succeed. >> reporter: if you think it's just a central valley problem, think again. in december, 1977 california was in the middle of a major drought. strong winds near bakersfield scoured the top soil creating a huge dust storm. it shut down highways, toppled utility towers, damaged property and killed livestock. the plume rose 5,000 feet and spread hundreds of miles as far as sacramento like a tidal wave. >> that top soil was shipped up here and just dumped everywhere. >> reporter: in that top soil, valley fever spores. dr. lynn was on duty at a sacramento hospital. >> we experienced several hundred cases from that dust storm here in sacramento. >> reporter: it killed six and spores can now be found in chico and redding. as for lower she knows. >> something in the air. >> reporter: and all it takes is a gust of wind. >> two cases of valley fever were reported in the bay area in the 1970s. it even killed one of the great apes at the san francisco zoo. the symptoms are common like the cold or flu and possibly a rash. >>> we are learning the c
in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving so, when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe. i had people who encouraged me, not just my mom and grandparents but wonderful teachers and community leaders. they never gave up on me. and so i didn't give up on myself. >> reporter: after five years in office, the plight of black and latino men and boys has the president's attention. his new initiative hopes to build on the successes of programs like kipp high school in the bronx. this year, 100% of the seniors have applied to college. >> i think that young men of color face a stacked deck. >> reporter: ramon de jesus is a kipp counselor. a kid from the neighborhood, he was the first in his family to graduate from high school and then college. mr. obama, he said, cuts through. >> his appearance, that's all the kids need. he doesn't have to say a word. "i am the president of the united states. don't i kind of look like you?" >> reporter: adrian portela is one of dejesus' ment peeps four colleges have already accepted him and he's waiting for more. >> i really want to
. and the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving, so when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe. i had people who encouraged me. not just my mom and grandparents but wonderful teachers and community leaders. they never gave up on me. and so i didn't give up on myself. >> reporter: after five years in office the plight of black and latino men and boys has the president's attention. his new initiative hopes to build on the successes of programs like kip high school in the bronx. this year 100% of its seniors have applied to college. >> i think that young men of color face a stacked deck. >> reporter: ramon dejesus is a kip counselor. he was the first in his family to graduate from high school and then college. mr. obama, he says, that cuts through. >> his appearance, that's all the kids need. he doesn't have to say a word. i am the president of the united states. don't i kind of look like you? >> reporter: adrian portella is one of dejesus's mentees. four colleges have already accepted him and he's waiting for more. >> i really w
attempt. >> and a delicate balancing act between the environment and economy at lake tahoe. >> and a live look tonight from the top of mount tam you'll see how wet weather improved outlook for water supply. good evening. this next round of rain isn't a strong storm, but every drop counts in a drought, obviously. spencer? >> you're right. and we're counting many drops w. you can see light rainfall now. you can see that right here in the san francisco area from san francisco and south we have a steady rainfall at the moment. giving you the looping radar, you can see batches of rain beginning and continuing i should saying to move into our direction. nearly 4-tenths in mount st. helena. again, rain continues throughout the evening and overnight hours the totals will grow and we'll have totals later. >> the storm isn't looking like a big rain maker but last two were stronger and wetter. wayne freedman joins us with a look. >> people have been hearing about the drought. bad
to do business, free or open more business friendly environment. >> having somebody like kuchar go out and say something we have been trying to say, what he did last night was more powerful times 20 of anything we have ever said. >> can i show you something from last night that is not anywhere near as powerful as that? joe biden may be the most frequent visitor to the fastest seven. he never failed to entertain when he hits a podium. last night, no exception. >> i told the president next game i have him. just remember, i may be a white boy, but i can jump. >> thank you, joe, speaking at a black history month event. kg. >> you know, he has a certain ch doesn't he? poor guy. he get a pass. what do you expect from him? it's going to turn into a plan. if you expect him to not put a foot in the mouth or both feet and both hands at the same time, please. >> i have to guess if it was someone on the right who said that -- >> that's not the terrible thing that he said. he called the voter i.d. bill proof of racial hatred. his quote was about proponent of the voter id bill. these guys never go a
to selected researchers and human rights activists in 100 countries. media independence, the environment in which reporters work and transparency, to affect news gathering. this year fin hand, the netherlands and norway lead the list. but the u.s., regarded by many as the world's leading democracy, ranked 46, one rung above haiti. sandy baron questions the low rating for the u.s. >> i think overall american journalists have very powerful protections, not the least of which is the general respect for rule of law in this country. the general respect for free press. >> a lot of people looks at the united states as a model. there need to be some improvements regarding the way the journalists and their associates are able to do their jobs. >> well, in fact some investigative journalists are saying that news gathering is becoming more difficult, especially when it comes to reporting national security issues. tony. >> randall pinkston, thank you. >>> antigay policies in russia is one of the issues, rosalind jordan, before i hack up a lung here. >> people who were protesting against their govern
in a more for giving environment. he had a mom and he had grandparents and teachers who really looked out for him. and his view was that every child should have the opportunities that he had. and we all have a responsibility to make sure that we provide that to them and there are many examples of programs that are working that are really improving these young men, the boys lives and putting them on a positive trajectory. and it is our collective responsibility to take the programs to scale so that we can touch many, many more men and do what we know will work. and that is not just for moral reasons. but because it is good for our economy. they are our workforce of tomorrow and we should invest in them. >> you talk about what is good for our economy and what is important for business. and after all, you will need the partnership of business. this is initiative that would be funded not by the federal government. >> that's right. the president said this is not another big federal government program. in fact, we shouldn't require additional resources. we should be smarter about how we use the
to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. >>> america's longest war may be coming to an end sooner than expected. the president ord ed the pentagon to draw up plans for a complete withdrawal from afghanistan by the end of the year. joining me now, jack jacobs. can i ask you this. is this posturing or does the u.s. really want to do this? >> i think we really want to do it but we shouldn't discount the fact that our politicians have a policy to think before they think, drawing lines in the sand we never tend to reinforce. so some of this is posturing but by the end of the day if we can't reach an arrangement with karzai, we're leaving. we are going to do that. we have areas surrounding afghanistan we can do some operations but i think the intention is to get out. >> a reporter wrote yesterday that u.s. officials told her that al qaeda is planning a comeback in afghanistan. some of that is politically motivated. how concerned are you that that is a reality. >> i think
a strong economic and diplomatic reaction from the west. but he has also ruled out military environment. he was the man who said ukraine was on the brink of disaster and this is a red alert situation. he has said that crimea is ukrainian territory. ukraine will not give it up. and ultimately the russian occupation as they refer to it and as the west are referring to it will not stand. the question is what exactly this deposit can do. the army obviously is much smaller than the russian army. they have told their troops not to fire the first shot, rather not to give russia a pretext. but they are looking towards the west for support. the question is whether the support that the west does provide will be enough to deescalate this crisis. >> okay. david stern, we'll leave it there. >>> thousands of orthodox jews are in protest over a draft to the army. >> reporter: this is how many of the streets of west jerusalem look right now. traffic has been completely blocked off. thousands of thousands of orthodox jews have come out against government plans to draft more young men from their community in
nation's infrastructure. he also said i am honored to replace my friend as chair of the environment and public works transportation and infrastructure subcommittee. he will be heading that up. tweeting outffice the president's new competition will help put americans to work by repairing america's infrastructure. is one by the american progress group in washington. everyone billion dollars invested in infrastructure equals 10,000 to 15,000 jobs created. california,ale independent. what do you think? they worriedre about the infrastructure when we have all of these buildings throughout the silicon valley and all throughout a bunch of places in america and none of them are filled with any businesses. they are there and they took up all of this money to build. host: you do not think any more infrastructure spending? caller: i do not think so. host: what about roads and bridges? caller: i think most of the bridges out here are good. we just finished the bay bridge out here a couple months back. it was way out of the ballpark and they should not have spent that much. host: larry, utah, re
party in midterm election and the exception was the 2002 in the post-9/11 environment. the buck is going to stop with the incumbent party in power because america is not happy. i think quite likely the outcome the republicans keep the house and a possibility the republicans will pick up the senate even losing mitch mcconnell's seat. we have to be divided again until 2016. it is an opportunity for the republicans to put together a proactive message. i think it's a good time to be talking about our plans for the future in 2016. >> donny, you can look individually at the president and the way congress is viewed but take this all in tolg totta. 80% are angry or dissatisfied with the way things are going in washington. it's and old theme at this point. we see it in just about every poll. as robert said this is a pox on both houses. >> it's only three-point spread i think between the democrats and the republicans both on the negative side. statistically, not a big issue. i actually think that this is going to be a case of best human being wins a race. i think one could give an argument -- joe,
that people in the bay area love on the farmer's markets, sanitizing the environment is not going to make sense for agriculture. we can't go there. >> reporter: then there's the expense like testing irrigation water once a week. >> for a smaller farm where the owners are working full time just to keep the farm afloat, it's going to be pretty much impossible. >> reporter: but this man says -- >> we feel like it can be done. >> reporter: he is senior scientist with western growers an industry group that represents some of the biggest agribusinesses in the state. >> it doesn't matter what size your farm is or your distribution. it's important to protect your consumers. >> reporter: he says members of his trade group including large organic farmers already follow strict new safety guidelines. manure is banned. composting is regulated and water testing requirements are much stricter. >> i'm unaware of anybody going out of business so far. >> reporter: back in washington, dana just hopes an agreement will come soon. >> just want to help others and make sure that they don't go through what i we
in the past has signaled a real frothy environment with companies going public after only one year of being held private. it would be a real benefit for them to start exiting right now while the ipo market is hot. they could get a decent valuation, presumably. $5 billion is what people said they were looking at. which is sizable. >> the question that people have, some cultures are very adverse to private equity. the germans call it locus. >> some people say that they do a great thing, they by companies in bad shape, turn them around, put them back on the market. others think that they play the stock market cycles correctly. things are out of favor, they pick them up and sell them on the wave. >> they get paid millions of dollars to time that correctly. sometimes it works out, sometimes it does not, but it seems to be paying off for these private equity sponsors. >> in the case of j. crew, when they took it private or last time there were multiple lawsuits involved that there was somehow collusion to get it at a cheaper price. those kinds of lawsuits are not entirely unusual, they do happen
the ones that are more adapted to those environments to succeed. >> reporter: if you think it's just a central valley problem, think again. >> large dust cloud. >> reporter: in december 1977 california was in the middle of a major drought. strong winds near bakersfield scoured the topsoil creating a huge dust storm. it shut down highways, shut down utility towers, damaged property and killed livestock. the plume rose 5,000 feet and like a tidal wave spread hundreds of miles as far as sacramento. >> that topsoil was shipped up here and just dumped everywhere. >> reporter: in that topsoil, valley fever spores. dr. neil flynn was on duty at a sacramento hospital. >> we experienced several hundred cases of "cocci" here in sacramento from that dust storm. >> reporter: it killed 6 and spores can now be found in chico and redding. as for lauer, she knows -- >> something in the air. >> reporter: -- and all it takes is a gust of wind. sharon chin, kpix 5. >> a few cases of valley fever were reported in the bay area back in the '70s. it even killed one of the great apes at the san francisco z
in these young men. and the only difference is that i kbru up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. >> congressman elijah cummings joining us right now, a democratic congressman from maryland. i know you were there in the east room of the white house, congressman. take us inside for you personally what was it like to hear the president really express these kinds of emotions? >> i tell you, it made me feel emotional, wolf, as an african-american man who was once an african-american boy. and to see those young men standing there. but the fact is that not only did the presidency himself in those boys, wolf, he allowed those boys to see themselves in him. and that is very, very critical. and that's the part that's been missing. we've got a president who has been elevated to where he is. but a lot of those young boys probably felt at some time this was unreachable. by him allowing himself to be seen, that is, to strip himself and let them know that he had been through what they had been through, i think is made a tremendous difference. as a matter of fact, one of the young boy
myself in these young men. i grew up in an environment that was a little more forgiving. when i was their age, i was a lot like them. i didn't have a dad in the house. i was angry about it even though i didn't necessarily realize it at the time. i made bad choices. i got high without always thinking about the harm that it could do. groups that have had the odds stacked against them in unique ways that require unique solutions. groups have seen fewer opportunities that have spanned generations. the worst part is, we have become numb to these statistics. we're not surprised by them. we take them as the norm. we assume this is an inevitable part of american life instead of the outrage that it is. the continuing struggles of boys and young men are falling by the wayside, dropping out, involved in negative behavior. we need to change the statistics, not just for the sake of the young men and boys but for the sake of america's future. that's why in the aftermath of the trayvon martin verdict, with all the emotions and controversy, i spoke about the need to bolster and reinforce our yo
difference is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. when i was their age, i was a lot like them. i didn't have ad in the house. and i was angry about it even though i didn't necessarily realize it at the time. i made bad choices. i got high without always thinking about the harm that it could do. groups that have had the odds stacked against them in unique ways that require unique solutions. groups who've seen fewer opportunities that have spanned generations. the worst part is that we become numb to these statistics. we're not surprised by them. we take them as the norm. we just assume this is an inevitable part of american life instead of the outrage that it is. [ applause ] >> and i -- and i believe the continuing struggles of so many boys and young men, the fact that too many of them are falling by the way side, dropping out, unemployed, involved in negative behavior, being pro filed. so we need to change the statistics. not just for the sake of the young men and boys, but for the sake of america's future. and that's -- that's why in the aftermath of the
, and i -- i think it's impossible in this environment to get anything done comprehensively. comprehensive immigration reform. comprehensive tax reform. the reason we had comprehensive health care reform, in spite of what you think about it, is because you had one party controlling the house, the senate and the white house. and so to do things comprehensively, i think it's tough on either side to get something done. i think you have to, you know, get more -- you're going to have more three yard gains in an environment that we operate in washington. you're going to have more three yard gains, than you're going to have 30-yard gains. it's just the reality of the system. so there's much in the bill that i think you could point to that was positive. but there's obviously a lot of things that even republicans would have concern about. to say that we'll create $700 billion in new revenue, alex, that's an assumption over a ten-year period of time, assuming that chairman camp would be the chairman of ways and means over the next ten years. i would buy into that. but even with that, that probably p
the environment was going to be like in the jail. he was very helpful. he came with me. and just every step i took towards the room. i remembered every thing that happened on february 20th. i was in so much pain. i had memories of my son. we walked in the room and i face the wall because at that moment, i was still thinking whether i really wanted to face this man or not. the minute they told me he entered the room, i turned around and i did not know what was going to happen. the minute i saw him and i looked so close to his eyes, i saw the evil in him. i saw no remorse and i saw that he was not really sorry. i wanted to tell him in person what my son goes through every day. >> what does your son go through every day? you told us every day you watch your son die. every morning you rush to your son's side because why? >> we live moment by moment with my son because he can suddenly just get sick. he doesn't give a sign that he is going to get sick, but he can get sick to the point where his oxygen drops. we have time to rush him to the er. we call the ambulance to take him to the er. every day my so
in the locker room. have you noticed anything different? >> no. it's the same environment. everything is the same. just -- like i said before, 12 years in the nba, not a problem, not an issue. year 13, not a problem, not an issue. same old, same old. >> that's it for me. i'm brooke baldwin. "the lead with jake tapper" starts right now. >>> the white house warns russia not to do what russia may have already started doing. i'm jake tapper. this is "the lead." the world lead. it's playing out like a tom changes see thriller. ousted ukrainian president viktor yanukovych breaks his silence and vows to fight for his country's future as russian troops are spotted. the politics lead. flashback friday. withheld pages from the clinton presidency is released and shines new light onla
house district in florida said this: >> we have a employers that rely on workers and in this environment where will you get people to clean hotel rooms or do our landscaping. >> and just this week, the united states un ambassador tweeted this out about the ambassador captured quoted: she did clarify this but the damage was gone. and the dnc vice chairman tweeted this to arizona, you have lost this argument 50 years ago and you don't get to decide who sits at the lunch counter. this case of foot and mouth calling it the lay of the year. she forget segregation was a product of the democratic party and all of them marched away unsc unscathed. in fairness, republicans do the same thing but their mega phone isn't as big. >> live in washington, d.c., thank you doug. >>> the power struggle intensifying in ukraine as the nation's new leaders accuse russia of a military invasion and we will look at the lengths that moscow will go to keep the former blocked soviet union under their thumb. and updates in the pamala philips trial. >> i could have him taken out. >> i could have him taken out. before
the prosupposed keystone oil pipeline. claiming it would damage the environment. nearly 400 people were arrested in the protest. >>> and finally, one of the great golf shots you will ever see. it came on the 18th hole in a playoff round in a women's tournament in singapore. take a look. everything on the line for paula creamer facing a virtually impossible 70-foot putt. look at that ball, trickle down, and then break about a foot right to left. tracing an arc into the cup. go crazy, paula. go crazy. >> she can't believe it. >> she can't believe it, no way. >> did i do that? >> her first title in four years. she says she could probably stand there again all day long and not come within six feet of the hole. a wonderful moment. >> that is so great. >>> the weather not so great for many people. >> you know, and it was so bad here. guess what, by next weekend here it will be 80 and nice. just to let you know. a special place to show you my weather. come on over with me. give you an idea of what's happened. the wind chill 12 below in chicago. 9 below in st. louis and 3 below pittsburgh. a real quick
a problem for kids living in some of the world's harsher environments. that is, until now. >> i was watching a news story, heartbreaking news story about the polite of children in war decency and refugee camps. it was explaining that the simplest and most effective therapy to bring them back to humanity was just a play, simple, unstructured play. >> that was all the inspiration tim needed. he knew there were programs sending soccer balls to developing and third world communities, but he also knew that those soccer balls didn't last very long in the harsh playing fields often found in those communities. he imagined a solution. >> to make a ball for these children that would never go flat so they could play and get that per pi. >> he is a a a lyricist by trade. 11 months and two tries later, the one world football project created a nearly indestructible ball made from unique cross ling cell foam that doesn't need to be inflated. >> when done you had something that could work? >> the very first thing they said was a total failure. when i took it out of the box, i threw it on the ground and it b
explained to them was i had issues, too, when i was their age. i just had an environment that was a little more forgiving so when i screwed up, the consequences weren't as high as when kids on the south side screw up. >> valerie jarrett is the president's senior adviser. >> in a brief interaction, he transformed many of their lives and touched their hearts as they did him. and so just imagine if we can do that all around the country. >> reporter: this afternoon, the b.a.m. teens are at the white house for the announcement of the my brother's keeper initiative. they'll donate at least $200 million over five years to programs like b.a.m. nationwide. >> sdwhwhat does becoming a man mean? >> it means it's time to grow up, leave all childish things aside. >> becoming a man means become a man basically. you know, stop being childish. persevere. >> same thing what these two said. take responsibility and deal with your things. deal with your actions and whatever outcome is you have to accept it. >> an outcome hopefully of change for a troubled generation. for a troubled generation. let's hope the
and dear to them. for george clooney, sudan. ashley judd pushes on hiv research and the environment. even elmo from sesame street, asking lawmakers to support music programs in american schools. hollywood stars say they understand there may be skeptics but if their celebrity can help advance a cause, they're going to take advantage of the spotlight. john and marci. >> karen, thank you. >>> a big legal defeat for actress lisa kudrow, ordered to pay her former manager $1.6 million. the "friends" star had oral agreement but no written contract for scott howard who worked for her for 16 years. the jury agreed kudrow owed him residuals. by the time "friends" ended, he was earning $1 million per episode. >>> another look at justin bieber after his arrest in florida last week. the 19-year-old superstar takes a sobriety test. now clips show bieber giving a urine sample were withheld. bieber has pleaded not guilty to drunk driving. >>> things are starting to get crazy down in rio, even before carnival season gets under way here. here is some proof. take a look. >> a couple of daredevils pulling of
. and the only difference is, that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. so when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe. >> reporter: teens from chicago saw themselves in the president as well. >> to my surprise, he was just like me. growing up without a father. and sometimes not too concerned with school. >> reporter: the event was to launch, my brother's keeper, a mentoring program for at-risk youth. >> part of our message in this initiative is, no excuses. it'll take courage, but you have to tune out the nay sayers who say the deck is stacked against you. you might as well just give up. or settle into the stereo type. >> reporter: this is the third time the president met with this group of teens from chicago. last time was on father's day and you can expect he will meet with them again. this is clearly a group the president established a real personal connection with. jonathan karl, abc news, the us white house. >>> jason collins said what he did last night over what he did after his team won, one of those cool treats. following the game he met wit
to 500. we don't have the same touch or nurturing environment. we'll get back and improve the outcomes. >> i want to take the moment to remind the viewers that morehouse targets the nurterring of young african american men. you and i know that there are class lines. asian students led with 81% graduation followed by white 80%, lat eachios 68 and blacks 62% - graduating high school, how do you think the president's initiative will narrow the gap. >> i want to absentuate that a bit. it starts with low reading lels. it's worse far african american males. 86% read below reading levels. it's no surprise that one in three go to prison. there's a cradle to prison pipeline. what we are trying to do is caning that, shift it from a cradle to prison so cradle to power pipeline. morehouse will have a lot to do with that. what the president announced is significant. it's a tie with the philanthropic community. that's where you saw the 200 million injected into this scenario. and that is - there'll be a lot more. also, the federal government will take part in ensuring best practices there are proils
to this. in future environments, ciber will be the first tool used. >> by both sides? >> by both sides. host: we are joined by paul mcleary a you are watching the exchange at the senate armed services committee earlier this week. the united states, it there's not much dispute that the u.s. has the best conventional military force in the world but how do our cyber capability stack up against other countries? guest: it's hard to measure. the chinese have put a lot of money into this and they have a lot of resources and assets directed toward this but their budget is not public like ours. you don't know exactly what they are doing. what general alexander was saying cuts to the heart of the matter. mightwar, whatever that be, offense or defense of, there is no manual for it. it is a whole new world, a new form of warfare. how do you conduct it, what does it mean, when would this lead to more conventional operations and how do u.s. collate or de-escalate and how do you make that a determined factor to prevent future conflicts? host: if you want to talk about these subjects or have a questio
, about other people and the movement. he also really cares about the economics and also the environment. i think that gets forgotten in a lot of this equal rights and stuff. but i really -- i'm hearing my voice going on, on the inform the other room -- >> host: heidi, do you have a question that you would like -- please ask it. >> caller: yes. i would like to know what he thinks about how obama has not really heeded the message that cornel west has about equality and meeting with him. it seems like tavis and west have gone out of their way to hold things in d.c., but that they don't get recognized -- >> host: all right. we got the point. peniel joseph. >> guest: i think it's being. i think somebody like obama -- obviously he has an emerge icon otography in the black community. some kwame would be very critical of obama and his policies, and when you think about cornel west and the critique they've had wednesday president obama, for the first anytime american history we actually had an african-american president. that's presented a conundrum for african-american civil rights leadership,
and get sick and ruin the environment and destroy, but they want to do all kinds -- we have a lot of unconscious behavior as you're aware, right? and i think that if the world meditated, we could make better decision. i think what the buddhist said, check for your yourself. because if you just listen to television, then you'll have a mind full of fluctuation and noise and that promotes sickness and sadness. if you can have a empty mind or a mind that is a little bit more clear, then your happiness comes. it's that simple. happiness, sick and sadness. >> russell, what brought you all of those years ago to meditation? people associate you with hip-hop and i don't think at least then they would have associated quiet meditation with the world of hip-hop. >> i did yoga first. i went to yoga class in brentwood. the teacher steve ross played loud rap music all of the time. i went there because of the chicks. all girls and one guy in yoga 20 years ago. >> that is why you get into anything. >> right. >> of course. i went to yoga and i came out of the first class quiet time and came out you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)